-=COACHES=-
Tom Landry  1960-1988
The first head coach of the Cowboys, Tom Landry led Dallas to two Super Bowl wins and five NFC titles in his 29 years at the Cowboys helm. He compiled a career record of 270-178-6, the third most wins in NFL history, and was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1990. Tom Landry was inducted into the Ring of Honor in 1993.  He died in 2000.
 
Years
Wins
Losses
Ties
1960-1988
270
178
6
 
LANDRY'S
ASSISTANTS

Ermal Allen, 1962-83
Offensive Backfield
Special Assistant R & D

Neill Armstrong, 1982-89
Special Assistant R & D

Raymond Berry, 1968
Receivers

Tom Dahms, 1960-62
Defensive Line
Chief Scout

Babe Dimancheff, 1960-62
Offensive Backfield

Mike Ditka, 1973-81
Tight Ends/Receivers
Special Teams

Brad Ecklund, 1960-63
Offensive Line
Defensive Line

Jim Erkenbeck, 1987-88
Offensive Line

Bobby Franklin, 1968-72
Defensive Backfield

Sid Gillman, 1972
Special Assistant R&D

Paul Hackett, 1986-88
Offensive Coordinator

Red Hickey, 1964-65
Offensive Ends

Ed Hughes, 1973-76 
Offensive Backfield

Al Lavan, 1980-88 
Running Backs

Alan Lowry, 1982-90
Special Teams
Receivers

John Mackovic, 1981-82
Quarterbacks

Jim Myers, 1962-86
Offensive Line/Asst. Head Coach

Dick Nolan, 1962-67, 1982-90
Defensive Backs
Receivers

Dan Reeves, 1970-80
Running Backs

Ray Renfro, 1968-72
Pass Offense

Alvin Roy, 1973-75
Strength & Conditioning

Jim Shofner, 1983-85
Quarterbacks

Mike Solari, 1987-88
Special Teams/Asst. Off. Line

Gene Stallings, 1972-85
Defensive Backfield

Ernie Stautner, 1966-88
Defensive Line & Def. Coordinator

Jerry Tubbs, 1966-88
Linebackers

Dr. Bob Ward, 1976-89
Strength & Conditioning

Don Cochren, 1965-95 
Trainer/Medical Records
Ken Locker, 1974-89
Asst. Trainer

Buck Buchanan - 1973-94
Equipment Manager

Ben Agajanian, 1965-1988 
Kicking Specialist

 
Jimmy Johnson 1989-1993 
 Johnson came and left in controversy.  In between he gave Cowboy fans some of their greatest thrills.  When Arkansas oilman Jerry Jones bought the Cowboys from Bum Bright, his first move was to hire his former Arkansas Razorback teammate and then NCAA National Champion Miami Hurricanes head coach and dismiss Landry. The move was unpopular with many fans who felt Landry wasn't treated fairly.  Johnson started slow winning only 1 game his first season, but with shrewd trades and lots of draft choices he built a team that would win two consecutive Superbowls.  After the second victory, he and Jones had a closed-door meeting and when he emerged it was announced that he was leaving the team.  After a season as an NFL Analyst with FOX he took the place of another NFL legend, Don Shula of Miami. He retired following a playoff loss in 1999. 
 
Years
Wins
Losses
Ties
1989-1993
51
37
0
 
Jimmy Johnson 1989-1993
JOHNSON'S
ASSISTANTS

Hubbard Alexander, 1989-96
Receivers

Joe Avezzano, 1990-
Special Teams

John Blake, 1993-95
Def. Line

Joe Brodsky, 1989-96
Running Backs

Dave Campo, 1989-
Def. Backs
Def. Coordinator

Butch Davis, 1989-94
Def. Backs
Def. Coordinator

Jim Eddy, 1993-95

Robert Ford, 1991-96

Steve Hoffman, 1989-
Kickers

Hudson Houck, 1993-2001
Offensive Line/Asst. Head Coach

Ron Meeks, 1991

Jerry Rhome, 1989
Quarterbacks

Dave Shula, 1989-90
Offensive Coordinator

Bob Slowik, 1992

Norv Turner, 1991-93
Offensive Coordinator

Dave Wannstedt, 1989-92
Linebackers/Def. Coordinator

Tony Wise, 1989-92

Mike Woicik, 1990-96
Strength & Conditioning

Larry Lacewell
Director of Pro & College Scouting

Kevin O'Neill, 1989-96
Trainer
Barry Switzer 1994-1997 Barry Switzer 1994-1997 
Before 94, the last place Barry Switzer would have ever expected to be was a head football coach in Texas.  Especially since he had been out of coaching since he had resiged his job as head coach at the University of Oklahoma in 1989.  With Johnson's departure, Jones wanted a proven winner.  Switzer's 3 national championships and the fact that he had been both Jones and Johnson's position coach at Arkansas made him the man.  He led the team to Superbowl XXX where they beat the Steelers in his second season.  But the next two seasons saw the team go downhill and Switzer left in 97. 
 
Years
Wins
Losses
Ties
1994-1997
45
26
0
 
SWITZER'S
ASSISTANTS

Jim Bates, 1996-1999 
Linebackers
Asst. Head Coach/Def. Line

Craig Boller, 1995-96
Def. Tackles

Tommy Hart, 1996-
Def. Ends / Scout

Joe Juraszek, 1997- 
Strength & Conditioning

Clancy Pendergast, 1996- 
Def. Asst./Quality Control

Ernie Zampese, 1994-96
Offensive Coordinator

Mike Zimmer, 1994-96
Def. Backs
Def. Coordinator

Jack Reilly - 1996, 2000-
Quarterbacks
Offensive Coordinator
Chan Gailey 1998-1999
 Jones wanted fresh blood to replace Switzer so he looked at many NFL assistant coaches and surpised many with his choice of Gailey.  Gailey's 10 years experience came as an assistant with Denver and Pittsburgh.  His last 2 years was as offensive coordinator with the Steelers where he developed one of the most exciting offenses in the league. 
  Gailey achieved his immediate goal of returning the Cowboys to the playoffs after they missed them in 97, but after two years of exiting the playoffs without a win, he was fired by Jones.  Ironically, he was hired thanks to his creative offensive mind, but fans grew tired of his conservative play-calling.  They often felt he was playing "not to lose". 
  Gailey did lead the team to an 8-0 undefeated mark within the NFC East in 98, a feat that had never been accomplished by any other team in the East.  A pretty impressive feat when you consider the great teams that have come from this division.
  Gailey will most certainly be remembered as a trivia question, "Who was the only Cowboys coach not to win a Superbowl?"
 
 
Years Wins Losses Ties
1998-1999 18 14 0
 
Chan Gailey 1998-1999
GAILEY'S
ASSISTANTS

Bill Bates, 1998- 
Def. Assistant

Wayne "Buddy" Geis, 1998-00 Quarterbacks

Jim Jeffcoat, 1998- 
Def. Line

George Edwards - 1998- Linebackers

Les Miles, 1998-2000 
Tight Ends

Dwain Painter, 1998- 
Receivers

Tommie Robinson, 1998-00 Offensive/Special Teams Assistant

Clarence Shelmon, 1998-2001 
Running Backs
Dave Campo 2000-

Jerry Jones named assistant coach Dave Campo as the fifth head coach in the franchise's 40-year history on January 26, 2000.  His first head coaching job on any level had an ominous start in the 2000 opener, when quarterback Troy Aikman got a concussion and newly acquired receiver Joey Galloway went down for the season with a knee injury.

Aikman's release after the season severely limited the salary cap in 2001. Losing him also started a carousel at quarterback seven starters over Campo's three seasons. His teams were often strapped by the salary cap restrictions due to the end-loading of free agent contracts from earlier in the decade.

Campo came to Dallas in 1989 as the last assistant added to Jimmy Johnson's first staff. Campo was Johnson's secondary coach at the University of Miami; it was his 11th college coaching job over 18 years.

After two years as defensive assistant, he became secondary coach, then defensive coordinator. The Cowboys won the Super Bowl in his first year as coordinator. He held the job four more seasons, then was picked over several assistants to replace Gailey.

He was the first to leave with a losing record (15-33). He's also the first to never win the division or make the playoffs.  He was fired on December 30, 2002 after 14 years with the organization.

COACHING CAREER: Central Connecticut State (1971-72); Albany State (1973); Bridgeport (1974); Pitt (1975); Washington State (1976); Boise State (1977-79); Oregon State (1980); Weber State (1981-82); Iowa State (1983); Syracuse (1984-86); University of Miami (1987-88); Dallas Cowboys (1989-2002).
 

Years Wins Losses Ties
2000-2002 15 33 0
 
Dave Campo 2000-2002

Wes Chandler - 2000-
Wide Receivers
Andre Patterson - 2000-
Defensive Line
Glenn Smith - 
Offensive Assistant
Wade Wilson - 2000- 
Quarterbacks

Bruce Coslet 2002-
Offensive Coordinator

Galen Hall 2002
Running Backs Coach
Greg Seamon 2002-
Tight Ends
Frank Verducci 2002-
Offensive Line

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Copyright © 2000 Tim Stone
Last Modified - Dec. 2000